5 writing tips from A. Lincoln

lincolns-sword.jpegOne way to improve your writing is to read good writers. Occasionally, if you are lucky, you come across a book on how a great writer writes. Such is Lincoln’s Sword by Douglas L. Wilson. No American president’s writings are so well known as those of Abraham Lincoln. His First and Second Inaugurals, and the Gettysburg address survive in part for the music of Lincoln’s words. But that music served a purpose; his style served the content masterfully. Here are a few things any beginning writer can learn from Abraham Lincoln, as revealed by Douglas Wilson.

1. To convince, you must first understand. Good writers are good teachers. To persuade someone to abandon one position for another requires that you show some empathy. Lincoln told a colleague

“that a peculiarity of his own life from his earliest manhood had been, that he habitually studied the opposite side of every disputed question, of every law case, of every political issue, more exhaustively, if possible, than his own side”.

So many books and papers nowadays argue one side, making all the available data fit one hypothesis. How refreshing, then, it is to read an author who understands the strengths and weaknesses, not just of her side, but of yours.

2. Don’t be an asshole. Or, in Lincoln’s words,

“if you would win a man to your cause, first convince him that you are his sincere friend.”.

3. Pre-write. Often a grad student will tell me that she has no writing to do. Lincoln’s personal papers are full of scraps of manuscript in which he tried out ideas. He did this for at least two reasons germane to science writing. First, writing out partial ideas helps to clarify them. Second, Lincoln anticipated the need for a well turned phrase long before events demanded it. So he started working on it before that day arrived. When it did, he was ready.

4. Always have paper and pen handy. Once, Lincoln was complimented on the quality and rapidity of his reply to some petitioners. In reply, Lincoln pulled out his desk drawer and said

“When it became necessary for me to write that letter, I had it nearly all in there, but it was in disconnected thoughts, which I had jotted down from time to time on separate scraps of paper.”

abe-lincoln.jpg

Those scraps of paper?

If Lincoln was out and about, he stuck them in his stovepipe hat.

Hipster PDA anybody?

5. Use simple words. Keep it short. Avoid fine writing. The style in Lincoln’s day was the long-winded, ornate “spread-eagle oratory”. Lincoln would lampoon such speakers:

“He mounted the rostrum, threw back his head, shined his eyes, opened his mouth, and left the consequences to God.”.

Now go to the Gettysburg address, linked above, and give it a look. How many fancy words do you see? This speech lasted no more than three minutes–the length of a pop song–yet is revered for its power. None of us will likely write anything like the Gettysburg address, but we can emulate Lincoln’s philosophy.

Or, as Blaise Pascal put it, “I have made this letter longer than usual, because I lack the time to make it short.”

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7 Responses to 5 writing tips from A. Lincoln

  1. Sam Heads says:

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  3. [...] a noteworthy post, the blog “Getting things done in Academia” summarizes five main tips from the [...]

  4. joefelso says:

    Wonderful—to these five I might add another piece of advice inherent is Lincoln’s writing—practice, practice, practice. I’ve heard it said that the economy of The Gettysburg Address owes a great deal to Lincoln’s experience writing telegrams during the war. Lincoln was ready to write in part because he was used to it. He was thoroughly conversant in the process of thinking and writing. Many of my students—even the really motivated and ambitious ones—just aren’t practiced enough.

  5. Misty Maynard says:

    Years ago I am sure I read a quote from Lincoln on good writing being like apple butter. I just loved it but I can not find it. Do you know it? It went something like this.

    but that is my paraphrasing. If you know the quote, I would love to have it.

  6. Misty Maynard says:

    Years ago I am sure I read a quote from Lincoln on good writing being like apple butter. I just loved it but I can not find it. Do you know it? It went something like this.

    Writing is like making apple butter. You start out with a full kettle and as it cooks the first thing you get is cooked apples but if you boil them down they turn into applesauce, but if you keep boiling off the excess when you’re finished down at the bottom of the kettle you get the very finest, most concentrated apple butter. That’s what we want, apple butter.

    but that is my paraphrasing. If you know the quote, I would love to have it.

  7. [...] a noteworthy post, the blog “Getting things done in Academia” summarizes five main tips from the [...]

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